Founded
in
1952
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Summer Marquetarian

The front cover of the Summer issue

The Marquetarian is a veritable mainstay of the Marquetry Society.
As it states on it's front cover, it is the "Journal of The Marquetry Society" and has been in existence in one form or another since the formation of the Society in 1952.

In those early days it was produced as a duplicated sheet (or sheets according to the amount of content) and it was yet to be another couple of years before it was produced in the booklet format we have become so used to.

Those early Marquetarians didn't even contain any illustrations at all except for a small design on the front cover!

The Marquetarian has certainly come a long way since those early days.
Today's magazine is produced to the highest standards that are currently available. Compiled on Mac's and PC's using the latest version of the industry standard "QuarkXpress" publishing software, it is now edited by Alan Mansfield who has recently taken over the mantle from that most respected of erudite Marquetarians Ernie Ives.

Ernie edited the magazine for thirty years, taking over the editorship from Max Newport in the late 1970's. Ernie has edited well over 120 issues of the quarterly produced magazine and has introduced many improvements in that time, notably full colour reproduction of marquetry exhibits and plenty of instructional articles.

Alan certainly intends to do his utmost to keep to those high standards that Ernie set; from the look of this Summer edition, it looks like that goal has been admirably achieved.

There is only one problem with the magazine and it is this; we are afraid that the only way you can get your hands on a copy of The Marquetarian is by becoming a member of the Marquetry Society! it is an exclusive publication after all - and how about this for a recommendation: around 99% of the readers of the Marquetarian keep every issue they have ever received, they never throw them away! how many magazines can you say that about?

So then, let's take a look and see what you will find in the Summer edition of the Marquetarian.

This edition of the Marquetarian features many educational articles we hope you will find fascinating. There is much to read in this latest edition, so let's (as we've just said) take a look at some of those interesting articles you will find inside:

This Summer edition of the Marquetarian has loads of articles which we are sure will educate and please you in equal measures.

There’s plenty for you to enjoy and learn from in this summer edition of the Marquetarian. For instance there is a totally absorbing article about how the restrictions imposed by CITES on the export and transportation of Rosewood and other endangered wood species affect our marquetry art and craft.

The article guides and informs you as to what you can and can't transport in and out of your country where those endangered woods are concerned.

You may be very surprised at what specie of wood are now on the protected list - read the article to find out more.

Our old friend, mentor, tutor and master marquetarian Alf Murtell passed away a little earlier this year. There is a wonderful tribute article to Alf in this summer edition of The Marquetarian.

I know that Alf will be enjoying seeing the Marquetry Society membership reading and enjoying his tribute from his comfy seat up there in heaven. A very gentle and kind fellow was Alf - do read his story.

"Why William Lincoln Was Right" is an intruiging article by Robin Moulson which delves into the history behind the present day methods used for producing marquetry,

William Lincoln was a past President of The Marquetry Society, and because of his influence in the veneer trade (he was the owner of Art Veneers Ltd) and his authorship of several influential reference books on the subject of timbers, veneers and marquetry, William (or Bill Lincoln as we all called him) was a voice of authority to be listened to when the subjects of veneers and marquetry came to the fore.

Robin's "William Lincoln" article certainly does explore in depth the origins of pictorial marquetry back to when it started to become highly descriptive of its subject in an artistic sense. This takes us well back to the Renaissance period and beyond. A very interesting article and well worth reading.

And don't forget the "Rosebowl - Almost Made It" series by Gordon Richards. This is a must read series which explores and investigates the marquetry pieces over the years which almost made Rosebowl status in their year of exhibition. A well researched series.

We then bring you the third edition of our very useful identification chart of veneers which are all unusual figuring and grain patterns. These are all genuine examples taken from veneers with odd characteristics in our veneer reference library and they are all featured in accurate colours. This series will provide a rather helpful guide for you when comparing veneers for your chosen marquetry project.

Each veneer example featured is taken from accurate scans of the genuine veneers and carefully colour balanced against the actual veneer itself in order to ensure it matches both the printed and true veneer as far as modern technology will allow us.

But, and then again, don't forget our regular 'Readers Letters' 'Chairman's Chatter' 'Independents Corner' and much, much more.

So, as is always the case, we have yet another excellent issue for your perusal!.





Contents page 259

The full index of the Marquetarian, from
the earliest issues up to today's,
is available by clicking the
button below:

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Click any of the following links to read the very
first issues of the Marquetarian:


number 1
 | number 2 | number 3 | number 4




 


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